Wednesday, August 24, 2011

It ends and begins on Septemeber 2nd

On September 2nd, a group of about 300 American consumers will hit a personal milestone. With the exception of a few items like undergarments, they will not have purchased any new clothing for a full calendar year. The will have completed their pledge to The Great American Apparel Diet. The first annual diet was launched in 2009.

Often times when people remove something from their lives for a set period of time they race out and indulge once they’ve met their goal. Like, if I gave up baked sweets for a year? I’d have a huge sheet cake waiting for me to jump upon and roll around in so that every pore of my body could soak up that butter, cream, vanilla, sugar…

I don’t have the impression these consumers are going to be renting U-Hauls to hold all the goods from some wild shopping frenzy after September 2nd.

I imagine they’ll simply sign up for another year of not buying new. I imagine they’ll recruit friends to join.

Radically changing your shopping behavior in America is a personal and spiritual journey. We’re blasted practically everywhere we go to purchase items, many items that serve no real personal purpose.

It’s time to consider if you’re ready to join this group for the coming year. Should you take this challenge and hold to it, I promise other parts of your life will change too, all for the better. I’ll sponsor you. Email me when you’re fighting the urge.

Yes, many people treat me like I’m “cute” because I shop reuse. This is not fluff. This is how we choose to spend our money, our personal resources.

Me? I'm now in need to go out an buy a batch of cupcakes.

If you know of other retail diets, please list them in the comments.

9 comments:

Emma said...

I'm joining! Right after I buy my homecoming dress :)

KDbeads said...

The only new clothing I've bought in the last, oh 5 years, was clearance bargain basement stuff......

Does that count? If it does then I'm on the diet, and have been for a while! And I can continue for many years to come.

vickigraff said...

I think I've been on the diet for a few years. I bought all of my maternity clothes second hand, my baby wears second hand (except for gifts, but I was even able to convince a few friends that yes, I wanted used clothing for the wee one). My husband's work shirts are all thrift. We all wear great clothing, just not new clothing.

I only buy undies, socks, and shoes new. I think I'll officially join the Diet. Some of my friends have been shopping thrift because I talk about it so much, so if I can get more people to join up, GREAT!

Daisy said...

I'm about to buy my son's "new" pants and jeans thrift style. He has poor strength in his fingers, and he handles the buttons and zippers much better when they're already worn in.

Jena said...

I like to participate in "Buy Nothing Day" ... it's the day after Thanksgiving. The Black Friday season is longer than ever now, and retailers have figured out how to make us buy in bulk to get discounts rather than get discounts on individual gifts. Stories like the Wal-mart stampede last year also remind me how THANKFUL I am to have choices in how/when I shop.

Shopping Golightly said...

Jena,

Thanks a great option for the day after shopping. The Goightly's have a long tradition on the day. We don't go shopping. We go chopping; our holiday tree that is: http://thethriftychicks.blogspot.com/2009/11/in-lieu-of-shopping-go-chopping.html

Beth said...

I agree that we need focus on things other than consumer spending as a measure of economic strength and security. However, I'm not on board with any campaign to bring down the retail industry. Though I rely heavily on thrifting and consignment buying and selling to meet my clothing and household needs, regular retailing has its place. Please consider shifting your emphasis to encouraging thrift AND buying local -- from farmers, independent business owners, etc. We also need to be mindful of paying cash whenever possible as credit cards fees exact a heavy toll on small businesses. Those are simple steps almost all of us can take that really can have far-reaching impacts on our local and national economies.

Alan said...

Congrats on the shopping fast. We can change things from the consumer end. My big complaint is the poor quality of goods. I buy vintage re-used mostly for the quality.

Shopping Golightly said...

Alan,

Funny story:

The girls did not formally participate on this diet though 90% of their wardrobe is reused. On her birthday, Little Pie wanted a black pair of Converse Chucks. We obliged. No later that two months, the rubber sole of one shoe was pealing back. So much for new.